Here are all of the posts tagged ‘content’.

We Are Social’s Tuesday Tune-Up #127

by Cristina Forlani

 

 

Nando’s Australia for “Free Schapelle”

The famous chicken chain recently jumped on a local huge news, the release of Schapelle CorbyNando’s Australia posted a message on Facebook and Twitter calling on Corby to try the Peri Peri chicken. Someone loves it, someone hates it: what’s your opinion on this? Share your thoughts with us in the comments below.
Nando's

 

“Love Same Sex”, says Durex for Mardi Gras

Durex launches a new social media campaign for Mardi Gras sponsorship: “Love Same Sex” aims to highlight and celebrate the years of love and commitment of long-term same-sex relationships in Australia. Durex is encouraging Australians in same-sex relationships to shout about the number of years that they have been in a loving relationship by taking to the Durex Australia Facebook page to pledge their years of commitment and to share it via their own digital channels. Participants will also have the chance to win a place on the inaugural Durex float at the parade on 1st March. Christine Forster, sister of Prime Minister Tony Abbott, and openly gay, has already taken part in the campaign with her partner Virginia Edwards, celebrating 7 years together.

Durex

 

Social posts by friends affect purchase behaviour

Social media really does affect purchasing decisions, according to January 2014 polling by eMarketer. This is true of millennials in particular, with 68% of 18-34 year olds surveyed stating that they were influenced to buy products at least somewhat by their friends’ posts. The same was true of 53% of 35-44 year olds, decreasing with age to 22% of those over 65. The younger group was also most likely to share photos and thoughts of new products and services; just 19% of males aged 18-34 said they never did so, and 18% of females – much lower than the gender averages across all age groups: 39% and 34% respectively. Facebook outdoing Google for referrals? Facebook is hugely outdoing Google for referrals to the Buzzfeed network, and had been doing so for all of 2013. The graph below depicts the data explaining sources of traffic to the network’s 200 odd websites. That’s a pretty big sample size and, even if it isn’t indicative of an internet-wide trend, it’s certainly an interesting area to watch.

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Facebook celebrates turning ten

Last week saw the tenth anniversary of Facebook’s founding, a milestone that the network celebrated with, among other things, an open letter from Mark Zuckerberg, personalised ‘Lookback’ videos at users’ time on the network and a film, shown below.

The birthday saw the production of a lot of literature about Facebook’s past and future, including a number of pieces by We Are Social. In Marketing, Tom Ollerton discussed what Facebook might look like in ten years, referencing the rise of emotion, increased competition and the network’s ability to purchase competitors. Meanwhile, Andy Spry spoke to the Drum about Facebook’s evolution into a mobile network, while Laura Muldoon looked back on what’s happened in the last ten years.  

 

Twitter releases redesign

Twitter showed off a whole new design last week, with changes including a new colour scheme and font. Here’s a screenshot of what it looks like now:

New_Twitter  

 

Twitter’s Q4 results lead to drop in share price

Twitter’s share price dropped by 18% after the release of its Q4 results, which saw monthly active users rise by just 3.8%. We Are Social’s own Leila Thabet discussed the news with Marketing, attributing future success to Twitter’s development as a second screen platform:

But despite owning the ‘second screen’ space, Twitter hasn’t yet been able to monetise its products to anywhere near the extent of Google and Facebook. At issue is Twitter’s lack of an algorithm to determine relevant content, which means it has to show all tweets a person publishes, to all of their followers. This creates a crowded and time-sensitive newsfeed, and promoted tweets can add to the confusion.

Twitter, however, displayed a positive outlook, citing the 30% year-on-year increase in MAUs and 121% jump in ad revenue over the same period.

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YouTube getting tougher on fake views

Google is planning to clamp down on ‘fake’ YouTube views, with brands currently able to buy 60,000 fake views (and the accompanying perceived popularity) for just $50. Philipp Pfeiffenberger, software engineer at YouTube, is quoted as saying:

YouTube isn’t just a place for videos, it’s a place for meaningful human interaction. Whether it’s views, likes, or comments, these interactions both represent and inform how creators connect with their audience. That’s why we take the accuracy of these interactions very seriously. When some bad actors try to game the system by artificially inflating view counts, they’re not just misleading fans about the popularity of a video, they’re undermining one of YouTube’s most important and unique qualities.

 

Microsoft invests in Foursquare

Microsoft has invested $15m in location-based mobile app Foursquare, after rumours last year of a potential purchase. The move comes at a time of change in Microsoft’s senior personnel, and is seen as the two companies growing closer, with potential consequences on the evolution of Foursquare into a more immersive platform. Reactive brands during the Superbowl Last year’s Superbowl saw the birth of the ‘Oreo Moment’, a term now used to describe any brand successfully reacting to a current event. It’s no surprise, then, that other brands had social media war rooms ready to respond to whatever might happen during the game. Jaguar used their ‘Villains’ Lair’ to defend their promoted hashtag #goodtobebad against attempted hijacking by the likes of Lexus, Esurance and Audi, while Hyundai forwent attempting to replicate Oreo’s reactivity, instead focussing on interactions with other brands and users. Dreft, Kevin Jonas and a sponsored baby birth Singer Kevin Jonas is having the upcoming birth of his child sponsored by detergent maker Dreft, allowing the brand exclusive access to content to share on Twitter. It’s something that celebrities have been doing with gossip magazines for quite some time – no doubt we’ll see more collaborations like this in future.

 

evian loves you like…

We Are Social has launched evian’s #ILoveYouLike campaign for Valentine’s Day, responding to users who use the hashtag like below. Running across Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest, there is also a competition element, with users encouraged to complete the sentence “I love you like…” for a chance to win.

 

TGI Fridays say #thankswingman

TGI Fridays is looking to build up its Twitter following this Valentine’s Day by paying homage to all the wingmen out there. The first 500 users to follow @tgifridays and tweet #thankswingman will receive a $15 gift card towards a plate of chicken wings, which may or may not be an excellent date idea.

 

Domino’s Twitter Meltdown

Domino’s Pizza last week ran a Twitter competition, asking users to tweet using the hashtag #DominosMeltdown. For everyone who did, the heat got turned up on a delivery man made out of ice; whoever’s tweet made the pizza finally fall won a year’s supply of their own. That’s a year’s supply of pizza, not delivery men made out of ice.

Melt-Dominos-post

 

AirBnB helps out with #SochiProblems

As you may have seen, the accommodation at the Winter Olympics leaves a lot to be desired. The hashtag #SochiProblems has taken off, which AirBnB has managed to turn to its advantage, tweeting at users with better places to stay.

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The tragedy of disaster marketing

by Dan Goodswen in News

Marketing Magazine recently published an article by me on using tragedy as content. They’ve been kind enough to let us reproduce it in full below:

the tragedy of disaster marketing

12 years ago, two planes were hijacked and flown into the World Trade Centre in New York, collapsing both towers.

A plane was also crashed into the Pentagon, and a fourth hijacked plane, supposedly heading for the White House, was brought down before it reached its target. 2996 people died.

The date was September 11, 2001. I’m sure you haven’t forgotten.

Nor have you forgotten those who died in the subsequent bombings in Bali. Nor the events in London on July 7, 2005. You will clearly remember the horrific tsunami that struck the Indian Ocean in 2004, and Hurricane Katrina, which decimated New Orleans, also in 2005.

Closer to home, you will no doubt remember the date of the Port Arthur Massacre in which 35 people died and 23 were injured. The annual flooding in Queensland and the bush fires that afflict much of the country in the hotter months – both claiming property, livelihoods and lives each year – will be fresh in your memory.

It probably hasn’t escaped your attention that next year, 2014, is the centenary of the outbreak of World War One – The Great War – a war that claimed over 37 million lives.

These are tragedies and disasters that affect us all, both personally and on a wider cultural scale. These are times to commemorate and reflect, commiserate and mourn.

However you choose to remember or forget such events, let us be clear on this: tragedies and disasters are not marketing opportunities.

Last week in the US, brands as large as GE and Verizon sent out reminders to ‘honour the memory of those we lost’ using the hashtag #neverforget, which many Tweeps were using to commemorate the 9/11 attacks.

Businesses as diverse as golf courses, plumbers, restaurants, sports nutritionists and tanning salons used 9/11 to give out discounts on their products.

‘Remembering the fallen heroes’ claimed one tweet, right before peddling their wares on the trending hashtag.

Much has been written before about how brands on social media are not friends with their customers, but it’s a point worth re-iterating, because brands need to understand their place – you are not people.

When a person likes or follows your brand they are giving you permission to talk to them. You are being invited into their newsfeed and their timeline along with their friends and family, but you are not one of them. You do not have permission to cross that line.

That line applies to topics such as sex, religion and politics – as it would when conversing with any customer – and it also applies to tragedies and disasters.

While social media has changed the way brands communicate with their customers, it has not changed the fundamental brand/customer relationship. You are still the brand. They are still the customer. The reason you are on social media is to sell things.

Never forget that.

The topics you have permission to talk about should be outlined in your social content strategy. They should be things that are valuable to your customer, and relevant to both your customer’s interests and to your brand.

When there is cause for national celebration, you may find some room in your content to reference it in a valuable, relevant way. But there is no valuable, relevant way to talk about tragedy.

I’ve said before that your social content strategy is as much about what you choose not to post, because everything you say as a brand on social media is marketing. Every post or tweet is branded content. You can’t brand grief.

Where I grew up, in the UK, tragedies were marked by an act of collective silence. At times like these staying silent will say more about your grief, and will sound a lot more sincere, than saying anything at all.

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The 6 Ws of social content

by Dan Goodswen in News

Marketing Magazine recently published an article by me on social content strategy. They’ve been kind enough to let us reproduce it in full below:

the 6 Ws of social content

In 2013, brands are posting an average of 36 times per month on Facebook. Over a year that adds up to 432 posts. That’s a lot of content.

With the average Facebook user liking 40 pages each, they’re now seeing a whopping 1440 updates every month. A solid social strategy will help you jump out of the murky newsfeed pond, but strategy is only half the battle. What we really need to talk about is quality.

It’s hard to maintain consistency in your content when you’re producing it at scale, especially with limited resources. But quantity shouldn’t mean a sacrifice in quality.

Here are six questions to ask yourself before you post anything on social platforms:

 

Why am I posting this?

Your social strategy needs to start with why and repeat on loop  ad infinitum. If you’re not constantly asking why, you need to drink more coffee and develop some anxieties. Same goes for your content.

Social content is not an afterthought. It is not filler. It isn’t a box to tick. Posting content because it’s funny or because you have to post something isn’t good enough. Neither is posting because the CEO asked you to, or because it got a lot of engagement when ‘Brand Y’ did it.

The answer you’re looking for is this: ‘because it is relevant to the community and provides value.’

And by value I don’t mean it saves them money. I’m talking about entertainment, information, advice. Value is what makes your content special. Value is what makes content shareable. Value is a customer insight, not a brand insight, and it’s the reason people want to engage with you on social platforms.

If you just do the same thing as everyone else, then you aren’t providing any value at all. If your content isn’t valuable and relevant, post something else. Better yet, don’t post anything. Go back to the drawing board and ask why you’re on social platforms in the first place.

 

Who is it for?

Your community is not your customers. Sure, your customers are in there, coiled in anticipation for the chance to click on a link to your latest product, but they aren’t going to do that unless your content speaks to them directly.

A consistent tone of voice will help. Your brand on social should sound like your brand everywhere else. Hopefully it sounds like someone your customers want to talk to. If not, fix that first, then come back. The post can wait.

It’s no good developing a fun, irreverent tone in order to ‘talk to the kids’ if your brand doesn’t always talk like that and your customers aren’t those same kids. It’s also no good being too sales-focused. You need to talk to your community, not at them. Think about the way your customers speak, think about the dialect and jargon specific to your location or industry. Make the content speak to your target audience. Rewrite or redesign until you get it right. Review and optimise your tone and style regularly.

You’ll reach more people talking to the right people than trying to reach more people by talking to everyone.

 

What do I want to achieve?

Most social content is confused. The call to action isn’t clear and it fails by trying to do too much.

Recently I saw this update: ‘How was your weekend? What are you going to do today?’

Two questions, two calls to action, low engagement. The questions cancel each other out. This should have been two separate posts, if it was the right thing to post in the first place. Remembering to put one call to action per post will save your engagement rate along with your blushes.

The type of update you post also affects engagement. Take Facebook for example. If you’re asking a question, then the goal of the post is comments. A simple status update will generate more comments than an image, but an image will generate more shares. So if you’re looking for amplification, post an image.

Everything you post should want to achieve something. If it doesn’t, then don’t post.

 

When am I posting this?

When you schedule a TV ad, chances are you try and do it at a time when your target audience are sitting down in front of the TV. Your social content strategy needs to take time into account also.

When are your audience online? When are they on Facebook? Check the data, find out. The days of ‘this has to go on out immediately’ should be well in the past. Your audience dictates when you post.

The half-life of a tweet is seven minutes. Depending on your engagement, the half-life of a Facebook post averages at around two hours (much less if you post poor content). Post at the wrong time and you’ll turn an urgent message into an unread one.

 

Where am I posting this?

A tweet has room for 140 of your finest characters. A Facebook status however, has room for 63,206 characters. That’s around 10,000 words, depending on the words.

Should you post a 10,000 word status update? Probably not.

The point is this: not all content works on all platforms, not all platforms engage with content in the same way, and each platform is home to a different community.

On Tumblr, 60% of all reflags are images, and using animated GIFs will ensure you get more of those reblogs. On Instagram, emotive images get more likes. On Pinterest, adding a price to your image leads to more click-throughs.

Each platform you choose to operate in needs its own content strategy. If the piece of content you want to post isn’t right for a particular platform, don’t post it there.

The platform-specific optimisations are many and minute, but it’s these one-percents that will give your content an extra boost, not a blanket of platform-agnostic mediocrity.

 

How else can I say this?

Ernest Hemingway once said, ‘The first draft of anything is shit’. He probably wasn’t talking about Facebook posts, but still. Too many updates are written once and posted first time.

The first thing you write might be adequate, but if adequate isn’t good enough for your product design, for your television ads or your customer service, then adequate shouldn’t be good enough for your social content.

Adequate is a failure. Be better.

Good copy is as little copy as possible. Can you say it in fewer words? Can you say it visually?

Think about your own news feed. What do you like to see? What would you click on?

Rewrite, rewrite, rewrite. And when you’re done, write it again.

Once you’ve asked yourself these six questions, you should be confident that you’ve got a solid, valuable piece of social content on your hands.

But there is a final variable in the social content equation that is just as important: you.

If you wouldn’t read it, if you wouldn’t comment or share or click, don’t post it.

Your community won’t tolerate bad content. You shouldn’t either.

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We Are Social: Tuesday Tune-Up #81

by claire.riordan in News

YouTube hit the 1 billion a month unique users mark

Online video giant YouTube put their success into context for us last Wednesday, announcing their achievement of 1 billion unique users per month. This means “almost half of the people on the Internet visit the online site each month”. Looking specifically at Generation C (18-34 year olds), YouTube stated that this “demographic spend 74% more time watching YouTube on their smartphones now than they were last year”.

Facebook cover photo policy has been changed

The rule against page cover photos featuring a call to action, contact information, references to price or purchase information has been updated. Page owners now have more flexibility in terms of what they can include in their cover photo, however the no more than 20% text overlay rule still applies. The rule for cover photos and ad images are now consistent, “this is important as cover photos are beginning to be included in both organic and sponsored page-Like stories in News Feeds”.

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Facebook to roll out its new commenting system

Facebook have been testing its new commenting system since November 2012, it “includes threaded conversations and a ranking algorithm meant to put the most relevant and high quality comments first”. The new updates will be available on an opt-in basis for all pages with more than 10,000 fans. Some of the key features of the new comments are the “option to reply to a specific comment and a ranking system that takes into account positive and negative signals, and connections”. Facebook are hoping the update will improve conversation management, enhancing the fans experience and public figure profiles.

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Facebook to introduce Lookalike Audiences globally

Last week Facebook rolled out Lookalike Audiences to Power Editor accounts, this is a tool which helps advertisers target similar users “to those in their Custom Audience database”. Facebook reported that Lookalike Audiences have decreased cost per action and an online retailer experienced “lower costs per checkout when the Lookalike Audience feature was in limited beta”. To create Lookalike Audiences a list of first-party data must be uploaded, such as, email, phone number or user ID to create a Custom Audience. Facebook then uses algorithms to analyse the Custom Audience and produces a Lookalike Audience based on demographics, interests and what people are talking about.

iPhone users make calls using Facebook Messenger for free

Following on from its successful launch in the US and Canada, it is now possible for iPhone users in the UK to make calls to other Facebook Messenger users for free. You simply open the Facebook Messenger app, select the person you want to call and hit the ‘I’ button.

Happy 7th Birthday Twitter

Last week Twitter celebrated its 7th birthday – In the last seven years the social network has gained more than 200 million active users who create over 400 million Tweets each day. Twitter is now considered by most to be the go platform for the “lastest news, to exchange ideas and connect with people all in real time”. To celebrate this milestone, Twitter have made a video celebrating some of the many moments on Twitter so far, and a few of the UK’s best known Twitter personalities have been shouting about why they love Twitter so much.

Britney Spears is first to reach 6 million followers on Google+

Britney Spears has had the highest number of followers on Google+ since November 2011, and is now the first person to reach 6 million followers. According to Starcount, Lady Gaga is hot on her heels with a mere 100,000 followers seperating them.

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Puma are paying for UGC

German sports giant, Puma, announced they’re trialing iPhone app, Foap. The new app allows users to upload photos to the platform and sell them to brands. Puma has asked Foap users to take photos in response to ‘Missions’ for its ‘Nature of Performance’ global campaign, the UGC purchased will promote the campaign across all social media channels. The ability to “create a library of content and achieve further engagement by getting users to rate the images” in Foap is one of the reasons Puma decided to use this platform.

Friendly Twitter war between Kit Kat and Oreo

A friendly twitter war can be fun and exciting for the brand and their followers, and this one is no exception:

A Twitter user tweets her two favourite chocolate brands…

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@KITKAT respond with a game of noughts and crosses…

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To which @oreo responded very cleverly…

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Oreo triumphed over KitKat on this occasion, we’re look forward to the next round!

Does Twitter really have an official Australian presence?

Social media commentator David Cowling recently asked what’s wrong with the official @TwitterAU account, and it’s a question that’s gotten a lot of attention, if not a lot of official replies. Repeated @ tweets to the official account asking for the number of active users in Australia were met with no response. Although the official Twitter handle launched back in October 2012, and senior execs have made scoping visits, there’s little evidence that Twitter have any dedicated resource locally.

Latecomer to the Aussie music streaming scene: Songl

Streaming music service Songl actually launched in October last year, but is now being relaunched with a PR and social media campaign as well as a whole heap of exclusive celeb content and playlists (the first new one was created by Sir Bob Geldof). The streaming service offers a $12.99 subscription model as well as an ad-funded version. It’s also backed by Digital Music Distribution (DMD), Sony, Universal Music and Southern Cross Austereo; early reports indicate some major artists are missing.

Spotify and Rdio already feature great social integration – we’ll be watching to see how Songl make their mark in the crowded social landscape of music streaming.

Songl

 

 

Interactive website aims to help gambling addicts

With the help of McCann Melbourne, the Victorian Government has launched fightforyou.com.au, which will feature video diaries of people trying to control their gambling habits. The online support service asks people to take a 100 day challenge and friends, families and even complete strangers can use the site to post messages of support. Forums and live chat functionality is also offered.


 

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We Are Social: Tuesday Tune-up #77

by Dan Goodswen in News

Australia first for mobile payments
Mobile money is the next big battleground, with the industry set to generate $A271.9 billion by 2018, up from just $A13 billion in 2013.

With competing products from PayPal and Square already in market in other territories, MasterCard have announced a new digital payment system – MasterPass – set to launch first in Australia by the end of March before expanding to other markets.

MasterPass works with a wide variety of devices, including smartphones, and stores customers’ banking and personal information in the cloud. Shoppers will be able to use MasterPass on the web without having to key in their bank information and delivery address for each purchase, and by waving a smartphone equipped with Near Field Communications technology near a special reader.

So it looks like for the at times woeful eCommerce offering in Australia, there’s MasterPass. For everything else, there’s cash.

The internet’s importance in product purchase decisions
Consumers are more likely to purchase a new product after reading about it on the internet, according to Nielsen research into those with online access. The extent to which this is the case varies by product category; electronics are the highest, with 81% of those surveyed answering that the internet affects their purchasing decisions. Social media plays a large role in this, as 30% stated social channels would influence their decision and 27% took into account content posted on video-sharing channels.

The UK spends more time online than the rest of Europe
The amount of time spent online has increased by 5% throughout Europe to an average of 26.9 hours per person over the month. The UK had the highest overall figure of 37.3 hours, but the most growth was shown by Belgium, whose 22.4 hours showed an increase of 2 hours since this time last year.

Mobile and social leading shift to digital marketing
A shift is being shown from traditional to digital media, with mobile and social leading the way. At the same time as 1 in 3 marketers intend to decrease budgets in print media, 76% are looking to increase their social budgets.

Facebook integrates free calls to iOS app in US & Canada
Whilst users in North America have for some time been able to make free calls over the Internet through Facebook’s messenger app, the network has last week updated its main iOS app to integrate the service. The new app also boasts other changes, including more visible buttons for liking, commenting on or sharing content.

Bugs have been misrepresenting Facebook reach for months
Facebook admitted on Friday that bugs have been leading to erroneously low figures for page reach over the past few months. When updating their mobile apps in August and December, Facebook tried to increase speed by reducing the necessary amount of information sent when displaying news feed stories. However, one thing that was removed ended up being the marker used by Page Insights to measure reach, resulting in reach figures coming out lower than they should have. The bug has been fixed and figures should be back to normal from today. It remains to be seen if this explains the full extent of the decrease in reach we exposed in November.

Facebook update Offers product
Facebook have made a couple of important changes to their ‘Offers’ product. Previously, the only option for users was to click the ‘Get Offer’ button to instantly redeem it, which would in turn automatically generate a story on friends’ news feeds. The first change means that there are now two different options: it is possible either to ‘Shop Now’ or ‘Remind Me’, increasing the flexibility of Facebook offers. Beyond this, users can now choose whether or not to share the story with friends. Combined, these look set to increase the usability of ‘Offers’ and potentially increase the number of users taking advantage of the feature.

Facebook looking to match in-store purchases to advertising
Facebook are to partner with data companies such as Epsilon, Acxiom and Datalogix to match in-store loyalty card purchases with individual Facebook profiles through their email addresses or phone numbers. The move would, in theory, allow marketers to target Facebook ads to those that have purchased relevant products in the recent past.

Facebook events get cover photos
In place of the thumbnails they had before, cover photos are now available for Facebook events. Unlike pages and profiles, though, this is the only image they will be allowed; events will simply have the large banner at the top, but no profile picture.

Brands increasingly taking to Instagram
Some impressive figures have this week been released about Instagram: 59% of the world’s top brands are now taking advantage of its massive potential audience, which includes 90 million monthly active users, 40 million photos per day and 8,500 likes per second. The extent of brands’ adoption of the network is shown in the graph below:

Sports giant adidas (and We Are Social client) has been highlighted as one of the most successful brands on the network, having managed to double its follower numbers to almost 150,000 under 3 months, averaging over 5,000 comments across 49 quarterly updates.

Twitter launches new ads API
Twitter have officially launched their new ads API, which allows marketers to purchase adverts from within the dashboards they use to manage their social platforms. This will allow brands to run adverts on the network more easily and it will be interesting to see how this affects the number and nature of Twitter ads. One fear is that the number will rapidly increase, a concern that Twitter have quickly looked to waylay, arguing that the changes will simply affect ease for advertisers, not volume. One thing that will be affected, though, is the extent to which ads can be targeted; marketers will now be able to create their own custom audiences.

Twitter testing new way to generate leads
Twitter are testing a new addition to their ‘cards’ functionality; a way for brands to create leads. It will work as shown below in a tweet from Twitter themselves about their small business guide; when clicking on the link, a button appears below saying “get it now” . It will be interesting to see if the system, which is currently still being tested, is rolled out further.

Twitter to add language and importance information to API metadata
Twitter is set to introduce two new features to its existing API metadata. The first allows identification of the language a tweet was sent in, which will be important for translation and filtering. The second allows yet further filtering, this time by importance – or what Twitter considers ‘high value’ tweets. Of the two features, this is set to be the most exciting, especially for brands, who can use the tool to better assess their own performance on the network.

Burger King & Jeep’s Twitter accounts hacked, MTV fake their own hack
This week has been a big one for social media disasters, most notably after thehacking of Burger King and Jeep’s Twitter feeds, as well as MTV ‘fake hacking’ themselves. Obviously, hacks can have hugely negative consequences if left unresolved, but We Are Social’s own Jim Coleman has pointed out some of the positives; notably, they attract a lot of attention. Moreover, they need not be too damaging if dealt with promptly and humorously. Burger King at least did the latter of these fairly well. Although their response could perhaps have been speedier, the lighthearted response, when it did arrive, was amusing and appropriate.

The incidents have sparked debate about Twitter’s treatment of brands, with only one type of account for brands with thousands of followers and individuals with very few. In particular, there have been calls for increased security and the introduction of two-factor authentication. Pinterest valued at $2.5 billion after $200 million funding round As its latest round of funding brought in $200 million, Pinterest has attained a valuation of $2.5 billion. The image-sharing platform has claimed that the money will be invested in product development, international expansion and acquisitions, with CEO Ben Silbermann stating:

Our focus is on helping millions of people discover things they love and get inspiration to go do those things in their life. This investment gives us more resources to help realize that vision.

Social media at the Oscars The Oscars last night were a hotbed for real-time marketing, following on from a similar showing at the Superbowl a few weeks ago. As stars walked down the red carpet, one actress was particularly popular on Twitter; for a time, #JessicaChastain was the second highest trending topic after #Oscars2013. Marketers took advantage of this, with Samsung, American Express, Royal Carribbean, Michaels Stores, Dell and Sprint amongst the many brands who purchased promoted tweets for the topics surrounding said actress. However, it is likely that, rather than being true examples of real-time purchasing, these tweets were purchased beforehand, based on forethought into the types of topics likely to trend. Oreo, heroes of RTM at the Superbowl, attempted a similar tactic again, this time posting four tweets related to relevant films, including one about the night’s fashion with a reference to zombie show ‘The Walking Dead’:

 

They also used the motion capabilities of twitpics, as can be seen in their James Bond tweet. Interestingly, none of these tweets received quite the same about of interaction as their Superbowl tweet, displaying how real-time marketing depends in large part on being truly reactive, as the blackout tweet was to a greater extent than last night’s.Another brand experimenting during the event was Smart Car, who posted a number of miniature takes on various award winners through Twitter’s Vine app, including the follow for ‘best actor’:

They have since made it clear that they had pre-recorded videos for every possible winner and have been posting the runners up throughout the day. Dulux’s real-time(ish) marketing at the Brit Awards With so much focus on real-time marketing at various big American events, UK brands are looking to get in on the act, too. A lot has been made of the below Dulux tweet, in relation to the Damien Hirst designed award statuette. However, whilst it may be an interesting way of producing topical content around paint, not normally known as the most exciting of products, the real-time element has been largely overblown. In fact, the nature of the statue had been known for months before the awards, meaning that this wasn’t really ‘real-time’ at all. A nice update, yes, but not in fact what has been described as an ‘Oreo moment’.

 

Ford give away 100 cars to bloggers and influencers
In a ‘social remix’ of their famous 2009 ‘Fiesta Movement’ campaign, Ford are giving away 100 of the vehicles to bloggers and online influencers, including celebrities, in exchange for their documenting the experience. The cars will be entirely free for six months, including petrol, parking and insurance in exchange for using content, which will be used by Ford across their social channels, as well as in traditional media, such as print and television.

YSL launch new ‘Radiance’ range with Facebook app
Yves Saint Laurent are celebrating the launch of their new ‘Radiance’ range with a Facebook app, which allows users to manipulate photos as if by using the new products. Users can upload a photo, which they can then alter by ‘glow’ and ‘vitality’, then share. Users can also download a voucher for a two-week free trial of any two products from the range.

Bulmers and We Are Social launch new flavours through social
Here at We Are Social, we’ve recently produced a campaign to launch two new flavours of Bulmers cider: Bold Black Cherry and Pressed Red Grape. The ‘try it first’ Facebook app will allow fans to enter for the chance to be one of the lucky few who get to try the flavour before everyone else. Key Twitter influencers have also been approached to be amongst the initial group.

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