Here are all of the posts tagged ‘mobile’.

Mobiles Surge Ahead in APAC

by Jason Mander in News

The team at GlobalWebIndex joined forces with We Are Social again for our new APAC Digital report, which we published recently. In this guest post, GWI’s Jason Mander shares his take on one of the hottest digital trends in APAC, and what it means for marketers.

As We Are Social’s new Digital, Social and Mobile in APAC 2015 report makes clear, Asia still lags (considerably) behind regions like North America and Western Europe when it comes to internet penetration rates. In places like India, for example, fewer than 1 in 5 adults are going online – which means internet populations in these countries tend to be skewed towards young, urban and affluent segments.

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These demographic trends are one of the major reasons why fast-growth markets are typically at the forefront of many digital behaviours such as social networking engagement and mobile internet usage. But it also shows why mobiles are so key to the future of this region: each year, tens of millions of APAC consumers are coming online for the first time, and many will be doing so via mobile.

Of course, the migration away from PCs and laptops towards mobiles has been much documented. But GlobalWebIndex’s long-term data on this area shows just how rapidly the switch is occurring in APAC; as our chart below makes clear, the average time per day that digital consumers in APAC are spending online is on the rise, but this is being driven almost exclusively by mobiles.

In fact, while the last three years have seen little change in the amount of daily time captured by PCs/laptops, the figure for mobiles jumped from 1.44 in 2012 to 2.21 hours in 2014. In terms of share, that means mobiles now account for 34% of time spent online in APAC, up from 25% in 2012. This pattern shows no sign of slowing: each year, mobiles are becoming more and more important gateways to the internet.

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Age-based patterns are particularly telling, here: the younger the individual, the more time they typically devote to the mobile web (with smartphones now accounting for 39% of total time spent online among 16-24s versus just 19% for 55-64s). In contrast, time devoted to linear TV and traditional radio increases in line with age, so it’s not simply that 16-24s are ahead for all media consumption behaviors. Rather, it’s that they’re leading the charge towards anything digital, and toward mobile usage in particular.

As always, generalisations are a dangerous thing, here. Across APAC, average time on the mobile internet per day is typically lowest in places such as Japan, Australia, Singapore and South Korea – where high internet penetration rates mean that online populations have much more balanced age profiles. But that mobiles are the devices carrying all the momentum in this region is beyond doubt.

Read the full Digital, Social & Mobile in APAC in 2015 report here.

 

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Oz Dean’s Adfest Diary – day one

by Lisa Collins in News

Campaign Brief recently published this diary post by We Are Social creative director Oz Dean, about his experience judging the Interactive Lotus at ADFEST 2015. They’ve been kind enough to let us reproduce it in full below.

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I am at Adfest in Pattaya, Thailand, representing Australia on the Interactive and Mobile jury presided over by Rei Inamoto (CCO & VP of AKQA). This is my first time at Adfest and I am honoured to have been asked to select this year’s best work in the region. On my jury are representatives from Tokyo (Nadya Kirillova from Dentsu and Tatsuro Miura from Hakuhodo), Singapore (Vinod Savio from Tribal DDB), Hong Kong (Sami Thessman from TBWA DAN) & Thailand (Atawoot Wesaranurak). An ex colleague of mine, Brett Mitchell of Pollen, also joined us as one of the Adfest collective ‘observers’.

As Pat mentioned yesterday, as Grand Jury President, Rei’s guiding principle for this year’s selection should be work “so undeniably good it can’t be ignored”.

That’s a phrase that rings true with regards the remote judging round which occurred a few weeks back. Some of the work during that round could easily be ignored or forgotten. Furthermore, having spent 3 years in Singapore, I can now spot scam entries a mile off. I quickly dismissed flaky and suspect campaigns that stood out as work entered purely to win awards. There was also work that employed technology without an insight or good brand fit/truth behind it.

As a jury we have two days ahead of us to get through the entries. Today we decided to tackle the interactive entries. We spent the morning finalising borderline work into finalists and then moved onto awarding metal in the afternoon. Thankfully I didn’t have to touch the PC (*shiver*) in front of me as we sifted through the work as a group.

We were, as history dictates, in a dark room in the convention centre (Peach) with just one window. The air con was way too enthusiastic for a room that small and we experienced conditions worse than a cinema in Singapore. Later in the day, the jury got creative and worked out the optimal (warmest) spots to sit. Tomorrow I will bring a jumper.

Onto the work. If I am brutally honest, the work wasn’t as high a quality as I had hoped for.  If any scam got through we didn’t pick it. Some larger network agencies in Asia were noticeably absent. There was a good amount of healthy debate about whether certain campaigns belonged in the category they had been entered in.

Having joined We Are Social last year, I was keen to see whether there were any truly social by design campaigns. There weren’t many but the ones entered were pretty solid. You’ll see those recognised on Friday at the awards ceremony.

The day went without any real lengthy discussions or disagreements until we came to the final Grand Prix decision. We mulled over this one for a good hour and a half, possibly lengthened because of the slip up of one unnamed jury member who forgot he should have abstained leading to some confusion and a recount/revote/tie that needed to be resolved before we could finish for the day. We landed upon the chosen one by asking ourselves what sets the bar high for next year and is the work pushing us forward?

Tomorrow we tackle mobile.

(Pictured: Tatsuro Miura, CD at Hakuhodo Tokyo; Vinod Savio, CD at Tribal DDB Singapore; Oz Dean, CD at We Are Social Australia; Rei Inamoto, Global CCO & VP of AKQA New York; Sami Thessman, Global ECD at TBWA DAN HK and Nadya Kirillova, CD at Dentsu Inc Tokyo)

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Mobile+: transcending mobile and the evolution of the digital portfolio

by Paul Napier in News

Marketing Magazine recently published an article by me on the evolution of mobile development and the digital portfolio. They’ve been kind enough to let us reproduce it in full below:

As new offerings from Apple, Google and others are integrated into the digital portfolios of clients, users and agencies, Paul Napier coins a name for the new generation of developers are being given the chance to arise: ‘Mobile+’.

Each year Apple and Google compete to bring increasingly audacious technologies to market. As a marketer it can sometimes be difficult to know who to approach for advice on how these new innovations can help our clients and users. Welcome to the era of Mobile+. But how did we arrive here?

On a chilly Cupertino Wednesday in October 2007 the world was casually informed that their way of life would change profoundly. But beyond the general population, there was a subset of people, myself included, whose lives would be so heavily impacted we would barely be able to remember what it was like before the advent of iPhone. Apple had created an industry: mobile app development.

In 2008, when the first software development kit (SDK) was released, mobile app development was fairly straightforward. There was one device. One screen size. Two orientations. Apps would run in portrait, or landscape or have it transition between layouts and the concept was one of immediate need fulfillment. Brands could integrate an app into their digital portfolio that simply performed a task, which enhanced a user’s life.

Then the likes of Apple, Samsung, Sony, Nokia, Blackberry and others began to add more dimensions, greater functionality, APIs and new devices to their phone portfolios. So we adapted, learned the relevant programming languages, grew. Mobile development became more of an art than a job and each new release gave us opportunities to discover ways of meeting clients’ and users’ expectations through improved speed, functionality and technology.

Tablets were released and a new dimension of creativity began. Apps that were hitherto confined by the space of a standard mobile phone were given free reign in the not-quite-laptop sized arena. Since this technology is something you can pick up and take with you, and since it follows similar rules, structures and layouts as well as the same programming languages and APIs, this was absorbed in the catchall ‘mobile’. And yet this term already began to feel strained as brands had to make choices over how to interact with their users when discussing the creation of apps.

Fast forward a few years to the current day, where the exciting news has arrived of the Apple Watch hitting the stores in 2015. Throughout this time we have seen a surge in technology breakthroughs: smartphones, tablets, clothing, jewellery, cars, watches, glasses and even fridges. Utilities, apparell and appliances all talk to us or help us to perform our daily tasks. We integrate a host of touchable screen sizes on various parts of our body through the day even using biometric data to identify ourselves. Usage across these technologies is growing at an explosive rate with the Australian market penetration for smartphones alone being predicted as high as 90% in 2015 (Australian Smartphone Market Study 2011-2015).

And who do we look at when we think about these technologies? Mobile app developers? Perhaps. But if so, this leaves us with two options:

  • We explore a new way to define the developers that cover these areas – perhaps a mobile developer is just that: one who creates apps for mobile phones, and these new platforms are a separate and new development area akin to the way the role was created for the original mobile development pioneers, or
  • we redefine the meaning of ‘mobile’ beyond the scope of phones – the raw constraint of a mobile developer is no longer applicable, since technology has expanded beyond it.

Truthfully, though, the answer lies in combining both. When we work in any environment, we cannot be constrained by the limitations of a title. Nor can we allow technology to move beyond us. We are living in a time where users are being given exciting new ways for them to interact with the world, their friends and their favourite brands. Now ‘mobile’ development means riding on the crest of technology changes, seeking innovation as we would draw breath. These burgeoning technologies open up avenues and choices for existing mobile developers to grow and transcend beyond the standard definition.

This parallels with our clients, who now seek guidance and advice on the right technologies, platforms and systems to help them express their messages and address their customers’ needs. The idea of the digital portfolio has evolved beyond a simply a website, a social presence and possibly a smartphone app. It is now a living breathing ecosystem, which encapsulates anything from a simple Facebook app, through to a system of integrated cross-platform, multi-device applications and can give birth to a new concept at any time. We must think beyond the means to deliver and focus on the message in a truly agnostic fashion.

So, as we seek to integrate the new offerings from Apple, Google and others into our clients’, our users’ and our own digital portfolios, a new generation of developers have been given the chance to arise: ‘Mobile+’.

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An Apple a day – the healthier option for branded apps

by Paul Napier in News

Marketing Magazine recently published an article by me on the newest addition to iOS8 – HealthKit. They’ve been kind enough to let us reproduce it in full below:

New health tracking features of Apple iOS 8 present opportunities for brands in industries from healthcare and insurance, to FMCG and travel, writes Paul Napier.

The new iOS8 is now available for users to download. As an iOS developer I have had several months to play around and come to understand the new features that come with this version of the operating system. As always with the new release of iOS, there are a suite of changes, some major and some minor.

One of the most exciting  additions to come out is HealthKit. So, what is it and how could it be used within your brand’s digital portfolio?

What is HealthKit?

HealthKit is the product of a two-year collaborative endeavour between Apple and Mayo Clinics, which services around 1.2 million patients every year. Their combined goal is to put iPhones and iPads at the centre of the self-health movement that has seen traction of the last few years.

At its core, HealthKit is a central hub/repository for gathering all the intelligence apps collect about a user’s fitness and health. Apps are able to upload their information about a user’s health and fitness activities into HealthKit, and in instances where users grant them permission, download this information and manipulate it to gather a better picture of the person currently signed into the app.

Users can see all their information at a glance, as it tracks their fitness activities such as running, walking and cycling from apps and associated wearable technology. Additionally, adapters such as glucometers, ECG devices, blood pressure monitors and even ultrasound have been created to give greater knowledge to users about their overall health, all of which can be stored in HealthKit and accessed by users through the simple interface.

In essence, HealthKit has removed the silo mentality that comes from having multiple apps for individual purposes, and encourages greater communication between health and fitness experts.

How can it help me?

At this stage, since the technology is in its infancy, it is difficult to predict where it could lead. The obvious beneficiaries of this technology, at least in the first instance, are companies such as Nike, Adidas and other fitness specialists or wearable producers. However, beyond the obvious, this technology opens an exciting avenue that could allow more diverse industries to begin working on a more intimate level with their customers:

Medical: There could be long-term benefits to the medical industry, which will have a huge database of reliable, or at least semi-reliable, information about people’s fitness and health. This information can be used to begin reviewing trends in health statistics against medical complications.

Healthcare: State medical facilities can build apps that can hook into a patient’s profile and read their medical data alongside health and fitness activities, giving the doctors and immediate understanding of the patients well-being prior to any medical appointment. Taking this even further, the patients activities could be tracked and the patient sent a notification when certain thresholds are reached, meaning that doctors can start to focus more on prevention rather than the cure.

Financial services: Insurance companies could look at the health and fitness of their customers to provide accurate quotes, or provide incentives to those who follow a healthy regime.

FMCG: Food and beverage companies could build apps that tracked users consumption and offered better nutritional options on food and beverages could be tracked against the user’s health needs, allergy requirements, blood sugar levels, fitness activities or goals.

Travel: Airlines could be made aware of any medical needs for passengers, or be alerted to dietary requirements, while encouraging their passengers with medical conditions to continue tracking throughout the journey to ensure the crew are alerted in the event of any pressing concern. Travel companies could track for potential changes in stress to enable bespoke packages to engage health focused customers.

Retail: Clothing and apparel companies could track clothing sizes using measurements given by the users then look at targeting them with the newest ranges in sizes that match the user’s statistics or intended goals.

This information on its own is but one facet of a potential medical breakthroughs in both the literal and mobile sense. We are seeing a swell in the information being gathered around individuals: location, behavioural, social, economic, psychological, physiological, etc. I recently wrote an article outlining the benefits of looking at implementing a social strategy within your mobile application, and with the advent of this new technology, never has there been a greater time to review this strategy.

The power of integrating social alongside this medical and fitness information could seem overwhelming, and it is most certainly not for every company. However, for those companies that have a legitimate reason to access this information, the potential options for improving user experience and engagement are greater than ever before.

On a final note, any idea should have a benefit for both sides, and provide information about the user back into HealthKit before drawing information in return. This way, HealthKit can provide ongoing advancements and the information you receive can become a more detailed and richer experience for both you and the user.

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We Are Social’s Tuesday Tune-Up #156

by Caitlin West

Reddit launches Ask Me Anything app
After a failed attempt at launching an app in 2011, Reddit has rolled out an app centred solely on its “Ask Me Anything” series. Featuring a wide range of participants, such as politicians, television and film stars, and musicians, the series is one of the site’s most popular destinations.

The app departs from the site’s trademark simple look, instead featuring a sleeker display. Using left and right swipe motions, users can navigate between different question threads, and have the ability to forward links by text, email, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, and other sites. The app also gives users the opportunity to filter content to their own preferences, enhancing their experience, and making it even easier to find out more about the famous, notable, and interesting!

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YouTube fan funding
YouTube is trialling a fan funding feature, giving users the chance to show even more love to their favourite channels. The feature can only be used if the channel owner has chosen to turn it on, and may provide further income for content producers, beyond ad revenue. While channel owners receive the bulk of the donation, Google claims five percent of the total, and a small fee. The feature is currently being trialled in the USA, Japan, Mexico and Australia, with views to expand in the future.

Social is increasingly important for marketers
The CMO Survey was released last week. The survey of 351 ‘marketing leaders’ shows social is becoming ever more important to brands; it now makes up 9.4% of marketing budgets, expected to rise to 21.4% within five years.

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However, as you can see below, ROI is still proving tricky. Particularly sad is the big blue section, made up of the 45% who can’t show the impact of all the fantastic work they’re doing. Expect to see increases in budgets for measuring ROI.

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How cost efficient is social advertising?
Very! Wonderful news. Q2 analysis by Neustar has found that social ads outperformed ad networks, portals and exchanges for cost efficiency. Look at the graph, the graph says it all:

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How social network ads affect buying decisions
So social ads are cost-effective, but which platform is king? Analysis by AoI Platforms of data from 500m clicks has found that YouTube is the best social network for introducing customers to new products, with Facebook coming in second. YouTube manages to perform well throughout the buying decision process, unlike Twitter, which is pretty much only useful during the middle phase.

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Over 50% of people have a mobile phone
Half of the world now owns a mobile phone. At the time that we published our article on the subject, there were 7.258bn global citizens (though a few more have probably arrived in the last week), compared with 3.630bn unique mobile users.

Facebook video views at 1bn a day
Facebook video views grew by 50% month-on-month between May and July and, since June, there have been 1bn every single day. Fidji Simo, Project Management Director of Video at Facebook, wrote:

Video is one of the most engaging and immersive ways to tell your story. Whether capturing breaking news, a baby’s first steps, or rising to a friend’s challenge for charity, it is a remarkable storytelling medium.

He doesn’t say what percentage are ice bucket challenges. We may soon know, though, as videos from public users and pages are set to display a view count in the near future.

‘Privacy Checkup’ debuts on Facebook
Facebook has rolled out ‘Privacy Checkup’, which it has been testing since March. Each user who logs in will see an option to edit their settings, guided by a cartoon dinosaur. (A tyrannosaur? Our taxonomy skills have left us wanting.) Here’s how it all works:

Twitter adds a buy button for mobile commerce
Get set to start purchasing through Twitter – the network has just added a ‘buy now’ button for iPhone and Android. It’s chosen 25 beta partners, which include two brands (Burberry and Home Depot), but are largely made up of celebrities. Musicians are an important part of the partnership, and celebs will be able to act as paid influencers for brands. You can find out about how it works in the below video:

Snapchat adds London geofilters
Snapchat has added 30 London-specific geofilters, which are only accessible in certain parts of the capital. Two of them have been revealed: the London Eye and Tower Bridge, but the other 28 remain a secret for now.

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Netflix adds greater sharing controls
Netflix is allowing users increased privacy over what they share on Facebook. Previously, anyone who had linked their accounts would automatically share what they’d watched with any Facebook friends signed up to Netflix. Now, you can tell everyone about that Scandinavian crime drama, but keep Gossip Girl to yourself (or vice versa, of course).

Social media talks about the NFL
The new NFL season kicked off on Thursday to a roaring online reception. There were 15m total Facebook interactions from 8.5 million users, and the network released a map of the most popular team in each US county, measured by official page likes:

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Frito Lays used the event to commence its latest campaign, in which fans must like a ‘Fire Drill Alert’ posted during Thursday night games, for the chance to win prizes from tubes of Stax to Superbowl tickets.

Asda set to launch YouTube commerce
Walmart-owned UK supermarket chain, Asda, is set to allow YouTube users to purchase its products without leaving the site. A new partnership with e-commerce service, Constant Commerce, will allow the brand to display a list of products alongside its videos, which users can add to their basket before checking out, without ever leaving the video.

Samsung launches #thatsucks campaign
Samsung has been walking the ‘fail’ tightrope with its latest vacuum cleaner campaign, dubbed #thatsucks. It has received a couple of negative responses, but in large part shows that it’s possible to take risks in social and succeed.

 

 

adidas crowdsources NYFW show
adidas put on the world’s first crowdsourced fashion show during New York Fashion Week. Dubbed #NEORunway, almost every element of the show was chosen by fans – from hair and makeup to music, outfits and even set design.

Starwood looking to LinkedIn with $30m campaign
Hotel chain, Starwood, is putting LinkedIn at the centre of its latest campaign, worth $30m. It is looking to promote its ‘Starwood Preferred Guest’ loyalty programme in the business market, making LinkedIn a good fit, though it will also increase the volume of its content on Facebook, Youtube and Twitter.

EA creates social media sitcom
EA is pushing the launch of the Sims 4 with a sitcom that takes place on social media. Four different characters, each with a personal Twitter account, will act out the story over two weeks. It’s based on ‘Gone With The Wind’, so they’ve taken a punt and are calling it ‘Gone With The Sims’.

Snuggle Bear gets social
Snuggle is bringing its mascot, the Snuggle Bear, into the 21st century. He’ll be debuting on various social channels for his 30th birthday, as part of an editorial-led campaign across Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram. Now, you’ve been very good and finished your whole mashup, so here’s a picture of the cuddly chap. Don’t say we don’t treat you.

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Half of Africa’s internet users now using Facebook
Facebook has recently announced that it has reached 100 million users in Africa, meaning that approximately 50% of all internet users on the continent now have a profile on the site. The announcement suggests that if improved internet connectivity spreads across areas of the world without steady internet access, such as South America and India, Facebook could potentially gain even more users.

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