Here are all of the posts tagged ‘YouTube’.

We Are Social’s Tuesday Tune-Up #127

by Cristina Forlani

 

 

Nando’s Australia for “Free Schapelle”

The famous chicken chain recently jumped on a local huge news, the release of Schapelle CorbyNando’s Australia posted a message on Facebook and Twitter calling on Corby to try the Peri Peri chicken. Someone loves it, someone hates it: what’s your opinion on this? Share your thoughts with us in the comments below.
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“Love Same Sex”, says Durex for Mardi Gras

Durex launches a new social media campaign for Mardi Gras sponsorship: “Love Same Sex” aims to highlight and celebrate the years of love and commitment of long-term same-sex relationships in Australia. Durex is encouraging Australians in same-sex relationships to shout about the number of years that they have been in a loving relationship by taking to the Durex Australia Facebook page to pledge their years of commitment and to share it via their own digital channels. Participants will also have the chance to win a place on the inaugural Durex float at the parade on 1st March. Christine Forster, sister of Prime Minister Tony Abbott, and openly gay, has already taken part in the campaign with her partner Virginia Edwards, celebrating 7 years together.

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Social posts by friends affect purchase behaviour

Social media really does affect purchasing decisions, according to January 2014 polling by eMarketer. This is true of millennials in particular, with 68% of 18-34 year olds surveyed stating that they were influenced to buy products at least somewhat by their friends’ posts. The same was true of 53% of 35-44 year olds, decreasing with age to 22% of those over 65. The younger group was also most likely to share photos and thoughts of new products and services; just 19% of males aged 18-34 said they never did so, and 18% of females – much lower than the gender averages across all age groups: 39% and 34% respectively. Facebook outdoing Google for referrals? Facebook is hugely outdoing Google for referrals to the Buzzfeed network, and had been doing so for all of 2013. The graph below depicts the data explaining sources of traffic to the network’s 200 odd websites. That’s a pretty big sample size and, even if it isn’t indicative of an internet-wide trend, it’s certainly an interesting area to watch.

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Facebook celebrates turning ten

Last week saw the tenth anniversary of Facebook’s founding, a milestone that the network celebrated with, among other things, an open letter from Mark Zuckerberg, personalised ‘Lookback’ videos at users’ time on the network and a film, shown below.

The birthday saw the production of a lot of literature about Facebook’s past and future, including a number of pieces by We Are Social. In Marketing, Tom Ollerton discussed what Facebook might look like in ten years, referencing the rise of emotion, increased competition and the network’s ability to purchase competitors. Meanwhile, Andy Spry spoke to the Drum about Facebook’s evolution into a mobile network, while Laura Muldoon looked back on what’s happened in the last ten years.  

 

Twitter releases redesign

Twitter showed off a whole new design last week, with changes including a new colour scheme and font. Here’s a screenshot of what it looks like now:

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Twitter’s Q4 results lead to drop in share price

Twitter’s share price dropped by 18% after the release of its Q4 results, which saw monthly active users rise by just 3.8%. We Are Social’s own Leila Thabet discussed the news with Marketing, attributing future success to Twitter’s development as a second screen platform:

But despite owning the ‘second screen’ space, Twitter hasn’t yet been able to monetise its products to anywhere near the extent of Google and Facebook. At issue is Twitter’s lack of an algorithm to determine relevant content, which means it has to show all tweets a person publishes, to all of their followers. This creates a crowded and time-sensitive newsfeed, and promoted tweets can add to the confusion.

Twitter, however, displayed a positive outlook, citing the 30% year-on-year increase in MAUs and 121% jump in ad revenue over the same period.

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YouTube getting tougher on fake views

Google is planning to clamp down on ‘fake’ YouTube views, with brands currently able to buy 60,000 fake views (and the accompanying perceived popularity) for just $50. Philipp Pfeiffenberger, software engineer at YouTube, is quoted as saying:

YouTube isn’t just a place for videos, it’s a place for meaningful human interaction. Whether it’s views, likes, or comments, these interactions both represent and inform how creators connect with their audience. That’s why we take the accuracy of these interactions very seriously. When some bad actors try to game the system by artificially inflating view counts, they’re not just misleading fans about the popularity of a video, they’re undermining one of YouTube’s most important and unique qualities.

 

Microsoft invests in Foursquare

Microsoft has invested $15m in location-based mobile app Foursquare, after rumours last year of a potential purchase. The move comes at a time of change in Microsoft’s senior personnel, and is seen as the two companies growing closer, with potential consequences on the evolution of Foursquare into a more immersive platform. Reactive brands during the Superbowl Last year’s Superbowl saw the birth of the ‘Oreo Moment’, a term now used to describe any brand successfully reacting to a current event. It’s no surprise, then, that other brands had social media war rooms ready to respond to whatever might happen during the game. Jaguar used their ‘Villains’ Lair’ to defend their promoted hashtag #goodtobebad against attempted hijacking by the likes of Lexus, Esurance and Audi, while Hyundai forwent attempting to replicate Oreo’s reactivity, instead focussing on interactions with other brands and users. Dreft, Kevin Jonas and a sponsored baby birth Singer Kevin Jonas is having the upcoming birth of his child sponsored by detergent maker Dreft, allowing the brand exclusive access to content to share on Twitter. It’s something that celebrities have been doing with gossip magazines for quite some time – no doubt we’ll see more collaborations like this in future.

 

evian loves you like…

We Are Social has launched evian’s #ILoveYouLike campaign for Valentine’s Day, responding to users who use the hashtag like below. Running across Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest, there is also a competition element, with users encouraged to complete the sentence “I love you like…” for a chance to win.

 

TGI Fridays say #thankswingman

TGI Fridays is looking to build up its Twitter following this Valentine’s Day by paying homage to all the wingmen out there. The first 500 users to follow @tgifridays and tweet #thankswingman will receive a $15 gift card towards a plate of chicken wings, which may or may not be an excellent date idea.

 

Domino’s Twitter Meltdown

Domino’s Pizza last week ran a Twitter competition, asking users to tweet using the hashtag #DominosMeltdown. For everyone who did, the heat got turned up on a delivery man made out of ice; whoever’s tweet made the pizza finally fall won a year’s supply of their own. That’s a year’s supply of pizza, not delivery men made out of ice.

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AirBnB helps out with #SochiProblems

As you may have seen, the accommodation at the Winter Olympics leaves a lot to be desired. The hashtag #SochiProblems has taken off, which AirBnB has managed to turn to its advantage, tweeting at users with better places to stay.

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Social, Digital & Mobile in APAC in 2014

by Abrye Redeker

By Simon Kemp, Managing Director at We Are Social Singapore.

Following on from We Are Social‘s hugely popular Social, Digital and Mobile Worldwide in 2014 report from last week, we’re very pleased to share an even more detailed look at the online landscape around the Asia-Pacific region.

It also turns out that a week can make a big difference when it comes to online data; in the past 7 days, and with the help of some of the 200,000 people who’ve viewed our Global report, we’ve found some even fresher stats to the ones we published in last week’s report.

These new discoveries have had a particular impact on India’s stats, where figures for internet users have changed from 151 million to 213 million. Internet figures for Indonesia have also almost doubled, to 72.7 million.

These changes have had a significant impact on the regional and global totals too, so we’ll begin with a refreshed look at the stats from the very top.

The Global Picture

Following revisions to a number of countries, the number of worldwide internet users now exceeds 2.64 billion, representing global penetration of 37%:

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Following our report last week, we also received a number of queries regarding the difference between mobile subscriptions and actual mobile users, so we’re delighted to be able include a new chart comparing the two in this report.

We’ve teamed up with the wonderful team at GSMA Intelligence for this, and they’ve been kind enough to let us share this valuable data for every country in APAC. You’ll find the individual country and sub-region data in the full report , but here’s the APAC picture:

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In order to understand the context in which people use mobile devices, it’s also important to understand how people pay for their subscriptions (contracts), and whether they have access to potentially faster mobile data connections.

The chart below offers more detail on both these areas, detailing how many people have pre- vs post-paid contracts, and using 3G as a proxy for the likelihood people could access faster internet if they chose to take out a relevant mobile data plan:

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Asia-Pacific In Context

APAC is home to almost 3.9 billion people, accounting for just under 55% of the total world population. The region hosts just under half the world’s Internet users, and 52.2% of the world’s active social media users:

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apac global share

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Internet

Although internet user data for a number of countries around the region hasn’t been updated as recently as we’d hoped, APAC has still shown impressive growth in recent months, with Asian countries alone adding more than 150 million new users since our previous report in October 2012 – many of which were in India and Indonesia:

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However, internet access is still far from a universal reality around APAC, and penetration rates in some countries remain surprisingly low:

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It’s interesting to see how the average number of hours spent on the internet varies around the region too, both in terms of desktop / laptop access, as well as the time spent on the mobile web:

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It’s important to note that the figures in the chart above are based on claimed time spent on the internet, rather than on actual traffic. This has two important consequences:

  • The data will, in part, reveal the story that people choose to tell about their internet use, rather than the exact number of minutes they spend connected
  • However, in a similar way, this ‘claimed’ data helps to avoid over-counting internet usage when someone is connected to the internet, but not actually making use of it (e.g. the browser is open in the background while someone works on another, non-internet related application).
  • There may also be some variations across cultures in what people consider ‘internet’ access. For example, someone who streams music through a service like Spotify for the whole day may not consider this ‘time spent on the internet’, even if we could argue the opposite is also true.

Social Media

2013 was an impressive year of growth across almost every aspect of the social media world in APAC, with chat apps in particular seeing stunning growth thanks to platforms like WeChat, LINE, and Kakaotalk.

We’ve chose to focus on social networks for this report’s data though, as they continue to offer the greater opportunity for marketers.

User figures and penetration rates for social networks still vary hugely around the region, but the overall trend is definitely upwards (note that MAU stands for Monthly Active Users):

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It’s worth highlighting that the figures for social media penetration often exceed those for internet penetration, especially in fast-evolving markets. There may be a number of reasons for this:

  • Social media stats are almost always more up to date than those for internet usage, largely because they are collected by a commercial entity on an on-going basis and published at least quarterly to help with advertising sales. In Facebook’s case, the monthly active user figures are available in almost real-time.
  • Many reports on internet usage and penetration omit mobile internet usage, meaning many mobile-only users aren’t included in the figures (partly because they’re more difficult to identify). In many emerging markets – particularly places like Indonesia or Myanmar – mobile-only use can account for a significant proportion of internet use. People accessing social media through mobile devices will be counted, however, meaning social media numbers are often a more accurate indication of actual internet use and penetration in these markets.
  • On the other hand, some people may have multiple social media accounts on the same platform, leading to a slight skew in the data, although we don’t anticipate this is the main cause for the difference between internet and social media usage numbers.

We’ve also changed the way we report user numbers in this year’s report compared to our previous report in 2012, and we now only report monthly active user numbers (MAUs) for any given platform. This ensures a more reliable and actionable data set, and ensures organisations using the data have the most up-to-date picture of people’s preferences and behaviour throughout the region.

Facebook’s MAUs continued to grow across the region over the past year, adding 54 million by January 2014 in Asian countries alone (excluding countries in Oceania like Australia and New Zealand).

China’s Qzone added 25 million MAUs too, meaning that overall growth around the region is somewhere in the region of 80 million new active users – almost 10% growth year-on-year.

We opted not to include chat apps like WeChat, WhatsApp, LINE and Kakaotalk in this year’s analysis for a couple of reasons:

  • The way that people use these platforms remains largely one-to-one, so they offer less of an obvious mass engagement channel for brands compared to platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Weibo (although we recongise that this is changing, especially with tweaks to WeChat’s platform);
  • The companies who operate these platforms tend not to publish monthly active user figures, and where they do, they aren’t broken down by country, making it very difficult for us to attribute usage by country.

However, for handy reference, the global user figures for each of the region’s largest chat apps are as follows:

  • WhatsApp: 400 million monthly active users worldwide
  • WeChat (Weixin): 270 million monthly active users worldwide
  • LINE: 300 million total registered users worldwide
  • Kakaotalk: 130 million total registered users worldwide

We’re pleased to offer time spent on social media for many of the region’s larger economies too, thanks to some great data from GlobalWebIndex’s Active Usage: Time Spent study, which they’ve kindly allowed us to share. You can find out more about this study here.

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As with the time spent on the internet chart above, this data is based on claimed usage rather than actual traffic information. This again means that data may be coloured by the story people wish to tell about themselves, but at the same time, it also helps to avoid over-counting time where people have social media open in the background.

Based on our qualitative research, many people keep social networks open throughout the day in a distinct browser tab or tool like Tweetdeck, but do not necessarily spend all that time actively engaging with the platform itself, so the data above should be used in conjunction with traffic-based numbers (where available) to paint a multi-dimensional picture of people’s behaviour.

It’s interesting to explore the above chart in the context of the societal norms of each country too; it appears that the time spent on social media is determined as much by a nation’s culture as it is by the speed or ease of internet access. In many countries where fast internet access is still a luxury, people still spend many hours engaging with social media, highlighting once again that social media are playing a huge part in the growth and evolution of the online landscape in APAC.

However, to enrich this story, it’s worth looking at the infrastructural elements too. Mobile devices play a huge role in Asia’s social media scene, so we’ve added an extra data set to this report to illustrate mobile social access in more detail:

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Mobile

The number of mobile subscriptions in APAC continue to grow steadily in the past 15 months, with Asian countries alone adding more than 200 million new subscriptions since our previous report in October 2012.

Although it’s likely that some of these new subscriptions constitute second subscriptions (e.g. an additional contract for work or personal use), the importance of mobile devices even in the region’s less developed nations highlights the critical role mobile plays in people’s daily lives in APAC.

While it can be tricky to identify the exact number of people accessing the internet through mobile devices, we have identified reliable data for two important indicators that offer valuable insights: mobile broadband subscriptions, and people accessing social media through mobile devices:

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It’s particularly interesting to note that the proportion of the population accessing social media through a mobile device is much higher than the penetration of mobile broadband, suggesting that many people continue to access social media through slower mobile connections.

You’ll find this data broken down for each country around the region in the full report.

The Individual Country Story

We’re delighted to announce that we now have social media and mobile data for every Asian country, as well as 4 key nations in Oceania.

Major additions to this year’s report are North Korea and Myanmar, and although the numbers aren’t likely to challenge China’s position as the dominant digital player in the region, it’s very exciting to see how online media are helping to open up some of the world’s most secretive nations.

In particular, Myanmar – or Burma, if you prefer – has surprised us with the sheer speed of growth, particularly when it comes to social media. From a country where Facebook was technically blocked barely 12 months ago, this Southeast Asian country now boasts well over 1 million Facebook users, and is still growing at an impressive rate:

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Despite these impressive numbers though, this still represents a social media penetration of just 2% in Myanmar, so there’s clearly plenty more potential for growth as the country continues its journey towards a fully open approach to the internet.

Even mobile subscriptions struggle to reach double-digit penetration, while the internet – albeit based mostly on fixed-line figures – languishes at just 1%.

However, 2014 looks like a promising year for Myanmar’s online landscape, and we’re looking forward to plenty more good news from them in the months to come.

The story in North Korea remains less clear; with the internet still officially blocked in the world’s most reclusive nation, it’s difficult to get a clear picture of what’s going on. However, Facebook themselves state that they now have 8,200 users within the North Asian state, 4,600 of whom access through mobile devices:

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It’s unclear how many of these users are actually North Korean citizens though, and we suspect that a significant proportion may be foreign nationals based in the country.

However, the fact that it is even possible for these people to access Facebook from within North Korea represents a step forward compared to the situation this time last year, so we’ll take that as a glimmer of hope for 2014.

We’ve also included data for Timor-Leste, which, although still small in absolute numbers, represents another reason for optimism, given the young country’s recent history.

East Timor’s social media population in particular is growing steadily, with 6% of the population – or 76,000 people – using Facebook at least once in the past month:

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As with many emerging economies, the numbers for internet usage in Timor-Leste are far lower than those for social media, mainly because it’s harder to measure the exact number of people accessing the internet.

Many people still access from shared devices in internet cafés or in places of work, and data is often collected by surveys that have taken quite some time to gather, analyse and publish.

Social media figures such as those made available by Facebook are almost real-time though, offering a more up-to-date and accurate picture of the online landscape within these fast-evolving digital ecosystems.

Excitingly, mobile phone subscriptions have already surpassed 50% penetration in Timor-Leste too, meaning many more people now have the opportunity to connect to the internet as soon as affordable mobile data plans become available.

Alongside figures for Australia and New Zealand, we’re also pleased to present some initial figures for Fiji and Papua New Guinea. Both nations play an important role in understanding the broader picture across Pacific nations, and the stories their data snapshots tell reveal some interesting insights:

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Fiji already demonstrates relatively strong internet and social media penetration figures, surpassing the regional average in both areas.

Meanwhile, Papua New Guinea still has plenty of potential for growth, with barely 4% of the population using Facebook in the past month. However, with mobile subscription penetration of 42%, it’s clear that Papuans have an increasing digital opportunity, and we’re confident these figures will all grow considerably during 2014.

We’re also pleased to share statistics on mobile social behaviour for all 30 countries in this study, ensuring marketers have a solid understanding of the opportunities to engage their audiences in a variety of settings and contexts – here are some example stats for Indonesia:

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As mobile increasingly becomes our predominant means of accessing online services and content, it’s likely that Asia-Pacific will continue to lead the world in defining the future of the online landscape.

The India Changes

Finally, given the major changes in internet user numbers since last week’s report, here’s how the individual country situation looks today:

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India Contract Type

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So there you have it – another week, another bumper collection of stats. Do get in touch if you’d like some help making sense of these numbers, or turning them into part of an actionable strategy.

Be sure to check back to our blog for more updates in the coming weeks too – given how quickly the data seems to be changing, it’s clear 2014 is going to be another vintage year for online growth. We’re already looking forward to next year’s APAC report!

Sources for all the above data are listed in the full report. We’d especially like to thank Tom Smith at GlobalWebIndex and Matt Ablott from GSMA Intelligence for their help in providing data for these reports, and for allowing us to publish their valuable data.

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We Are Social’s Tuesday Tune-Up #121

by Gillian Collison

Social media updates from passengers stranded in Antarctica

Some of the 74 passengers currently awaiting rescue on Russia’s MV Akademik Shokalskiy have been keeping family and friends updated via Twitter, Vine, Youtube, Google+ and Skype. Passengers Alok Jha and Laurence Topham, who are journalists with The Guardian, as well as Chris Turney, a professor and leader on the expedition have been posting about penguin sightings, cake availability and the rescue attempts thus far. You can follow all the action of their adventure at #spiritofmawson.

 

Myer’s Boxing Day website crash causes social media backlash

As shoppers flocked to grab post-Christmas bargains both in-store and online,  Myer’s woes continued with their website crumbling under heavy traffic leaving many frustrated customers with this message:

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Many initially took to Twitter and Facebook to express their dismay:

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However, fans of Myer on Facebook were quick to defend their social media team and thanked them for their continued updates and polite responses. As of the 31st of December, Myer’s website is still closed. CEO Bernie Brookes has announced extra discounts and exclusive online offers once the site is back up and running.

Is Facebook ‘dead and buried’ to European teens?

Research into the behaviour of European teens aged 16-18 has found that Facebook is becoming less and less important, as the demographic moves towards the likes of Twitter, Instagram, WhatsApp and Snapchat. The key reason given for the shift is the desire to stay away from their parents, which could prove severely costly for the network. Daniel Miller, lead anthropologist on the research team, put the situation in no uncertain terms:

For this group Facebook is not just falling, it is basically dead, finished, kaput, over.

However, some have looked to cast doubt on the research. The BBC’s technology correspondent, Rory Cellan-Jones, has argued that the sample groups are too small: for example, the above quotation comes simply from examination of UK teens aged 16-18. He also states that Miller gives too much weight to interviews, arguing that there is no reason why a small sample group of teenagers professing their love for Twitter should prove that teens are leaving Facebook ‘in their droves’.

Further research has shown that, across all groups from age 18 upwards, Facebook is still the most popular of all social networks. A report into UK social media users found that 18% of over-65s were on Facebook, a leap ahead of the 6% on second-most popular site YouTube. The same study also showed the continued popularity of the network with 18-24 year olds; the question is how Facebook copes as its audience begins to age.

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The extent of Facebook’s organic reach decline

A string of studies have shown there to be a vast decrease in organic reach since Facebook’s announcement at the start of this month. One piece of research into 21 large brand pages found an average dip of 44.3%, with one page experiencing a decline of 87.8%. This had an impact on engaged users too: a 34.5% decrease, on average. Edgerank Checker also examined the changes, analysing one week either side of the 2nd December. Their research showed a dip in reach of 21%, from 9.4% to 7.5%, with status updates suffering the worst.

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Facebook is the top social network on smartphones

Facebook has been crowned the most popular social network on smartphones in 2013, on a list that also includes YouTube, Instagram and Twitter. Facebook was in fact the most popular app of all, with a monthly audience of over 100 million and a year-on-year increase of 27%. Perhaps surprisingly, Instagram came three places higher than Twitter; its 7th place was supported by a monthly audience of 32 million and 66% year-on-year growth, compared to Twitter’s figures of 30.8 million and 36%.

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Foursquare’s passive smart phone tracking

Foursquare is extending its data capabilities through constant, passive tracking of smart phone locations. This functionality, necessary to power its ‘passive notifications’ feature that tells users about nearby places, is providing the network with further data to sell to advertisers.

Coca Cola’s #ReasonsToBelieve

Coca Cola are focussing on positivity in their latest campaign, dubbed ‘Reasons To Believe’. As well as the video ad shown below, they are supporting the activity with the hashtag #ReasonsToBelieve on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook, through which the brand is asking fans to share their own acts of kindness.

Mastercard’s #PricelessNewYear

Mastercard is asking its social media communities to share their ‘priceless moments’ from 2013 using the hashtag #PricelessNewYear. The best will be shown on billboards in New York’s Times Square during this year’s New Year’s Eve celebrations.

Smart Car USA call for selfies on Twitter

Smart Car USA are encouraging their Twitter followers to share a selfie using the hashtag #smartwrapme. Winners will then see one of the cars dressed up, inspired by their own looks.

 

Leica selling cameras through Instagram

German optics company Leica is enabling fans to purchase its latest camera, the Leica C, directly via Instagram. Users will need to register with Arco, a startup that enables purchasing through the network, then follow the @Leicabrasil account, which will be uploading a number of photos taken with the camera. Fans can then simply comment ‘purchase’ on any of these in order to buy the product for themselves.

LinkedIn’s top 25 skills for getting hired

LinkedIn has produced some analysis of the skills that got people hired in 2013: at number one, it’s social media marketing. In fact, tech skills form a huge part of the top 25: numbers two and three are ‘mobile development’ and ‘cloud and distributed computing’ respectively.

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This Week According to the Internet #44

by Daniel Karney

jammies18n-1-web

This week; surprise secret Santa from Bill Gates, warm fuzzies from WestJet’s Christmas giveaway and an adorable next level Christmas card.

Check out what we’ve been following this week:

WRECKING BUDGETS: It’s our PM’s turn to come in like a Wrecking Ball (last Wrecking Ball parody, we swear!)

WARM FUZZIES: If this ad from WestJet doesn’t make you smile, nothing will.

CUTE: Are hilarious music video spectacles the new Christmas cards?

BACK FROM THE DEAD: Much loved Brian returns to Family Guy…fans thrilled (except this guy)

SECRET BILL-IONAIRE: Who knew billionaires had time for Secret Santa?

(Image via)

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We Are Social’s Tuesday Tune-Up #119

by Abrye Redeker

#HipsterSanta approves Sydney’s new Central Park shopping centre

#HipsterSanta has been introduced as a PR initiative to drive awareness and encourage sales at Sydney’s new Central Park shopping centre. While the campaign is supported by traditional OOH media, it is socially lead through Twitter & Instagram channels created by #HipsterSanta himself. Shoppers are encouraged to get involved on Instagram & Twitter by posting tagged photos for the opportunity to win store vouchers.

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Holler uses shock value to raise funds for charity

The rules of disruption were changed in Holler’s latest “shocking” activation to raise Christmas money for charity. Flipping the advertising model on its head, Holler let the audience become the disrupters by crowdsourcing electric shocks which were administered to several of their team members. The entire endeavour was streamed live and Holler donated $1 to The Factory for each shock that was sent. Participants were encouraged to socially share the activation to raise awareness. In only 4 hours the team was able to reach their goal of $5,500 – that’s 1,375 shocks per hour. Let’s hope they’ve recovered.

Disrupted Xmas – A live, Interactive, Installation by Holler from James Théophane Jnr on Vimeo.

Facebook introduces autoplay for videos

After testing the system for a while, Facebook has begun to introduce autoplay videos for mobile and desktop. Earlier in the week, most users on iPhone and Android received the system, which works as follows: as you scroll past a video, a preview begins to play without sound. If you don’t want to watch it, just scroll past. If you do, you can click for the full viewing experience, including audio. Later in the week, desktop users began to notice the same feature, which Facebook will be continuing to roll out to more and more users.

Facebook release tool for gauging sales

Facebook has launched a new tool for advertisers, allowing them to track users who saw a promoted post and ascertain which of these then went on to make a purchase either online or in a physical store. Retailers can offer Facebook the information they have on customers, including email addresses and phone numbers, and find out which of these have seen a promoted post.

Instagram introduces direct messages

Instagram has added the ability for users to send direct messages. A user can send photos or videos to anyone who follows them, with the two then able to converse underneath the message. If you don’t follow someone, you’ll get a notification to a ‘pending requests’ centre. Instagram announced the changes in a blog post, which included the below video.

Brands have already started using the system, too. Fashion brand Gap sent direct messages to the first 15 people to reply to a message; from these, winners were selected to receive a denim tablet case.

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Hyatt Hotels have been sending messages to their fans, too, wishing them a Merry Christmas.

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Twitter users can send images in direct messages

Twitter has introduced a few updates to its apps for iPhone and Android, including the ability to send images in direct messages. Messages are also easier to access through a tab at the bottom of the screen, while users can swipe to switch between the ‘Home’, ‘Discover’ and ‘Activity’ sections of the app. For Android only, there is now a star button next to the ‘Follow’ tab, allowing users to receive notifications for whomever they choose, whether it be a celebrity or one of their friends.

Twitter adds ‘Broad Match’ to keyword targeting

A few months ago, Twitter introduced keyword targeting, allowing advertisers to target an audience based on specific words in their tweets, or those with which they engage. Now, the network has added ‘Broad Match’, allowing them to automatically include related terms in the search. Those related words can include synonyms and alternative spellings, as shown in the below image.

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Twitter tests ‘Nearby’ screen

Twitter is experimenting with a ‘Nearby’ feature, which would allow users to see tweets from everyone in their vicinity. The below image shows how the ‘Nearby’ screen would work: it’s essentially a map, with a blue icon for the user’s location, below which there’s a timeline of nearby tweets. The locations of these tweets will be shown on the map above.

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Twitter reverses ‘block’ button change

Twitter has reversed the changes it made to the ‘block’ button very shortly after their introduction. The new system, which allowed users to RT, follow or reply to those who had blocked them, was met with widespread public disapproval, which Twitter rapidly took on board.

Google+ to serve social ads across the web

Google+ has introduced a new type of ad, called a +Post ad, which will allow brands to promote G+ updates across the ‘Google Display Network’. The ads, which will comprise the ability to +1, comment or share, should serve to greatly extend the reach of branded content on the network, as well as of the network itself.

Live streaming on YouTube

YouTube has announced the ability to live stream, which will be available to verified accounts that are in ‘good standing’. Video manager will contain a button from which account holders can begin a live stream, as well as the ability to launch a Google+ Hangout directly from YouTube.

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Kik reaches 100 million registered users

Messaging app Kik has reached 100 million registered users, and is reportedly adding 250,000 every day. The success comes partly due through its anonymity – users go by a username rather than providing their phone number – as well as ‘Kik Cards’, which are basically mobile web applications.

Dunkin’ Donuts hold Google+ Hangout

Dunkin’ Donuts has continued its social media experimentation by hosting its first ever Google+ Hangout. In it, the brand’s executive chef, Stan Frankenthaler, will reveal the winner of a $1,000 prize for a photo submission contest. The campaign, which was itself hosted via social media, asked fans to submit a photo of a recipe to either Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Pinterest.

Andy Murray gets SPOTY congrats from adidas

British tennis ace, Andy Murray, yesterday capped off a successful year by winning the BBC’s Sports Personality of the Year award. Playing on his reputation for blandness, adidas posted the below tweet about their star’s achievement; to date, it’s received over 13,000 retweets.

Samsung makes mistake in trying to hush YouTuber

A good rule for electronics manufacturers is not to make products that set on fire. A good rule for anyone who’s heard of social media is not to try and silence someone who’s making a complaint online. Last week, Samsung did both of those things. When YouTube user Ghostlyrich complained about his phone in a video after being asked for ‘proof’ that it was broken, Samsung issued a list of demands he’d need to abide by in order to get his phone replaced. These were to:

delete his YouTube video, promise not to upload similar material, officially absolve the company of all liability, waive his right to bring a lawsuit or other legal complaint, and never make the terms of this agreement public. A witness would also have to sign the form.

Instead of doing so, he decided to make another video, which went viral. The lesson: when people have a legitimate complaint about your product, deal with them fairly.

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